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Matt, Nino and I with the F3 and Miller DS20 Solo sticks

Insipiens from Philip Bloom on Vimeo.

INSIPIENS: Latin. Translation: SENSELESS

To play the commentary, load the video file up and then play the commentary simply press play and pause on video when told to

Insipiens commentary by PhilipBloom

 

Sui Caedere from Philip Bloom on Vimeo.

It’s just before midnight on Tuesday night and have just finished my edit of my simple short film “Insipiens”. Conceived and shot in a very short period of time, about 4 hours.

I have just finished a 3 day full on DSLR workshop in Mallorca with Nino Leitner and Sebastian Wiegaertner and it was a huge success. We split the group up into 6 teams and gave them a challenge to make a short film…More on that in another post when I have all the files to share with you. Whilst guiding the teams I got an itch and a half…no, not an itch that makes you need to see a doctor but simply I NEEDED to shoot something for myself. Where we were on the Island was simply stunning. San Jordi. As soon as I laid eyes on it I knew I had to film there.

Nino (Nina K) was a godsend. A beautiful woman who knew how to perform. I met her at the CF Live workshop back in DC but she came to learn much more at this 3 day event in Spain (we are planning the next one soon!)

It’s a mixture of handheld shooting (no rig as I don’t have one yet) and tripod shots. It’s handheld for a reason, no interesting in stabilizing it. I wanted it to look handheld!

Lens wise it was the 18-50mm Cooke Made 2nd RED lens and one CP.2 prime the 85mm.

Before and after with Colorista II and the keying de-popping trick to even out skin

 

Colorista II skin blemishes tutorial from Philip Bloom extras on Vimeo.

www.gopb/colorista

I used Magic Bullet Looks to grade (20% off at Checkout with code bloom29) and I also used Colorista II to smooth out any and make Nino’s skin look more flawless… Watch Simon Walker’s excellent Red Giant Software demo of how to do this. I did and had great success…this is the before (left) and after (right) and it took me just 5 minutes to apply using a key and a pop filter. It’s an incredibly powerful colour grading tool with amazing features and so easy to use. It’s $299 from scratch by clicking here

Cedric Conti scored this at very short notice and it’s perfect. I had a temp track of Erik Satie which guided him to the mood and he did a wonderful job!

This film’s concept is very simple. Utter beauty shattered by a moment of senseless ugliness. Something that happens in the world countless times every day.

I also wanted to show how three edits of same film can have 3 different emotional reactions,,,although one edit with the additional shot at end is in an in joke for the dslr community and know who Nino Leitner is and that our actress has  the same name

The second version, called “sui caedre”, which takes a big chunk of the film out, the violence leaving a more ambiguous but still disturbing ending.

Please watch all three if you can…

Nino: The alternate edit of “Insipiens” from Philip Bloom on Vimeo.

 

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Comments

  1. Willy B! says:

    Wow. Never saw that coming. You got me, hook, line and sinker! Great work…

  2. ArneZsng says:

    Such a dark soul. ;)
    Great short.

  3. cmedia says:

    I was just about to go to bed and thought to check your website to see what’s new.. and I have to say I really enjoyed that. Nice pace, actually really liked the handheld shots(felt more personal than just pretty to look at), color grade was nice and subtle, good choice of track as usual and beautiful actress to go with it! nice one.

    I have to say, the more and more I see the F3 and images you can get from it, the more I think about ditching the idea of getting the Af101 and investing some of my own money in a Sony F3.

    I mean I know the panasonic is great ‘bang for buck’ as you said in your review, but it just can’t come close to Sony F3 for image quality? I’m also guessing you didn’t have the S-Log update at this point?

    Thanks again for sharing your work, much appreciated.

    1. Nino Leitner says:

      Philip shot it with the in-camera XDCAM EX as it says above (S-Log also isn’t available yet). If you are looking for something price-wise comparable to the AF101, check out the Sony FS-100. Nice little thing, same sensor as the F3, but only 8bit output.

  4. Ronald Vonk says:

    It looks fantastc, I scare myself!! Thanks for letting me be a part of this I had a lot of fun (though everyone is going to be avoiding me now probably)

    Still at the murder scene but leaving tomorrow.

    1. during the course you made such an good impression… just to see what you are capable of afterwards! ;)

      1. Ronald Vonk says:

        Yes I was seduced by the dark side. Darth Nino made me do it.

        1. I can fully understand you mate. It’s difficult to refuse Nino the Mafioso…

    2. Nino Leitner says:

      Amazing, Ronald. Your best performance since “schmoke in a pancake”!

      1. Ronald Vonk says:

        Hehehe you evil bastard!

  5. Zack Gietek says:

    Great choice of music- I really enjoy your work, fantastic work Philip! Yes, I too was surprised–hooked,lined, sunk…
    Cheers

    Z

  6. EliBZ says:

    Beautiful! Although, (and maybe its just due to my current lousy internet connection)is it just me, or were there weird white pixel artifacts over Nina’s dress pattern on the closeups?

  7. Marc says:

    I was just watching this with my 6 year old daughter. She liked the pretty dress. Then you killed her. My daughter asked me why the bad man killed the pretty lady. I had to tell her the truth. Because Philip Bloom is the devil….

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      oh no! sorry your daughter watched that…tell her the new edit is coming where I run in punch the man save her!

      1. Ronald Vonk says:

        I want a stunt double if we ever shoot that :)
        I deserve it though! Sorry to hear your daughter saw that!

    2. Nina K. says:

      I just had an ingenious idea for extended ending … Nino the Leitner delivers his infamous monolog, camera rolls forward focusing on him while we soak up his badness, suddenly he gets whacked in the head with a 6 inch heal of a sparkling sandal, then close up on Nino the Georgian dripping wet but insanely calm, as Leitner plummets to the ground she speaks “….Nino is a girls name… you schmuck…”. Continued: close up on the hand writing on the back of the sangria bar receipt titled “My Shit List” 1. Philip Bloom 2. Vonk 3. Matthew Nagy. Leitner might be bad-ass now… but in the end, I shell come out of it as The Ultimate Bad-ass…THAT is the ending kids really want to see…

  8. Brodie Gwilliam says:

    if i had a dollar for everytime ive done that to a girl…. i would have 1 dollar…….

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      you even have one dollar! Ouch!

  9. Terry says:

    Ow! sucker punch! I love how the cinematography just completely fools you. Although I’m not sure if I love the outcome. If you see what I mean!

    Really great.

  10. Terry says:

    And echoes of a talented chap called Ripley….

  11. Rob Koers says:

    Wow, mister Bloom.
    What’ve you been smoking on that island? ;-)
    Didn’t know that there was a dark(er) site of you!
    Great job anyway. Love’d the handheld shots.

  12. philipjames says:

    Great filming as always but I found the story end disturbing, theres enough of this shit in the world and women are vulnerable enough as it is without promoting this kind of recklessness. maybe I’m being sensitive and it’s just my personal opinion, but something a bit more empowering would have made a better end. IMHO. Sorry Phil

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      that was the point Philip. It is a piece exactly about what happens right now. I am not in any way promoting this kind of behavious! It’s a film about just how bloody horrible our world is.

      1. philipjames says:

        From that perspective point taken, and it certainly works well! It shocked me and maybe I was too quick off the mark and missed the point.

      2. Jon Roemer says:

        I’m with Philipjames on this – the film immediately struck me as gratuitous.

        Many here and on Vimeo are commenting about the twist but I didn’t see it that way, at least in a satisfying sense as a viewer. Something that makes you stop and think, makes sense in the context of the story, or that informs the story.

        I looked up “insipiens” and all I can find is “foolish.” Not sure what that’s supposed to add. A comment on the situation or the man’s character? If so it seems to lack the weight needed given what happened.

        Maybe I’m missing something?…

        1. Philip Bloom says:

          “Insipiens” also means Senseless http://www.wikiled.com/latin-english-insipiens-Default.aspx

          is it gratuitous? Not really. It is a film that is about perfect beauty being shattered by a senseless act. Much like what happens every day thousands of times in our world.

  13. …and you all killed Nino! Whose idea was it? The not-so-pretty Nino?

    1. Nino Leitner says:

      Did you just insult the lady??

      1. …and now it’s all clear who was behind this atrocity. I could smell it from the beginning! Nino, I really liked you… :(

  14. Craig says:

    Alright!!! Narrative from the Bloomster! Keep it coming Philip.

    If I could just say also @philipjames, come on man, the short wasn’t promoting anything and certainly wasn’t a commentary on any social level. I got ying-yang, the juxtaposition of the beautiful landscape and the horror of the act, if you’ve watched Philips stuff before you’d know that the ending was completely left field, I for one did not expect it.

    To say this was promoting anything is unfair, the piece showed two ends of a spectrum, you can’t have on without the other, in fact the contrast of the two enhanced the beauty of the piece for me. The piece also highlights how sucked in one becomes whilst watching such things, I’m sure Brecht or Haneke would love this, just as a simple exercise in rupturing the passive positioning of an audience.

    I loved it, proof that most good ideas are the most simple.

    1. philipjames says:

      Hey Craig, you’re right my choice of the word ‘promoting’ was not the best one, of course you wouldn’t promote such an act. Having seen Philip’s explanation I completely understand the point now and as such it worked brilliantly as it provoked such a reaction from me.
      It does illustrate that things can be taken many ways and my first reaction was that it had markings of a misogynist nature, god knows there are many males around who don’t like women (I’m not suggesting Philip is one). I suppose from a personal point of view too many films/tv programs are based on senseless violence and I’m more than bored with it.
      Anyway, I support Philips creations and effort in every way and I’m not trying to be a critic for the sake of critique, I was just responding to the immediate affect it had on me and it succeeded brilliantly. Job Done!

  15. LFK says:

    oh I didn’t see that coming ! :O
    Once again, excellent work. So gorgeous, poetic, romantic.
    I just don’t get it ; why would the man do something like this at this moment, in this magical scenery, with this beauty ?

    Maybe it’s metaphoric to show that humans destroy the beauties of this world with no reason..

    Anyway ; it’s a wonderful Film in every aspects.
    Thank you for sharing.

    Fred

  16. Nino Leitner says:

    You are a machine, Philip. Churning out this thing so fast after you’re back is amazing.

    I thought about it and I agree that it works much better without the restaurant scene that we shot (with Ben, Wendy & Chris). By getting rid of them you make Ron’s presence more relevant because (the other) Nino is otherwise always by herself in the film.

    Of course the end scene of the alternate version blows everything else out of the water. Such an amazing performance. ;)

    I’m so bad-ass!

    1. Pedro says:

      Oh dear, don’t tell me about that cutted scene… Chris was soooo excited to be on this short film… I will have to take out her for a dinner tonight to compensate for not being there… Well, at least she will be on the BTS and in few stills.

      But yes, must recognize that it makes more sense without that scene…

    2. Ronald Vonk says:

      I agree, the edit works well like this. The extra stuff would just distract.

  17. Yann Gourhant says:

    Wow!
    I’d love to see how Steve Weiss reacts to this one!
    I remember how you two discussed violence on Critics…

    It’s funny how “two-sided” your work is. On the one hand, you’re filming how beautiful the world is, on the other hand how dark it can be…

    I think I prefer the light side. But the contrats is interesting…

    Regards,
    Yann

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      he will HATE it!!

  18. nigel says:

    Nice shots. Handheld stuff works really well for this… but to be honest the different light in the end scenes was distracting.

  19. My initial response to the film was confusion. The twist felt totally random and out of place leaving me frustrated that such a beautiful setup was all for nothing. BUT… after a moment I realized that that is exactly how it is supposed to make you feel. That’s the beauty of it. The story is meant to make you feel uncomfortable, to make you stop and think about how senseless people have become. Well done!

    The alternate edit was great : )

  20. Chico says:

    Inspiring cinematography, and great acting! What subtlety in movement, I won’t be surprised if she’s a dancer. She is not a godsend, she is a goddess! (forget M. Sheen ever used the term).

    One thing I take away from this short, it’s never about the gear…but the narrative / theme.

    The only thing I would change is the shot where Ronald Vonk sort of wades in to be beside Nino K. I’d prefer a close up of a solo Nino K’s back then cut to a wider shot showing Mr. Vonk already beside her, as if how he got there was a mystery itself (as well as her ensuing death). He wasn’t there when she entered the water, and suddenly there he is. But of course, you can’t storyboard these things if you only have 4 hours… so great shooting nonetheless.

  21. Al Hill says:

    Great! A twist on the usual beauty shot lens/camera tests out the on the “interweb”. And why not? Look people it has a story! And many people are talking about it. Isn’t that what great films are supposed to do?

    Hey, Philip, did any of the locals wonder what you were doing violently drowning a woman on a public beach without a permit? Or can you get away with murder if you have an F3, and look like you know what you are doing?

    When you think about it, that would be the ultimate way to commit a murder. Could you just imagine the Police interviews with the locals, “Do you remember what the Cameraman looked like?” “No, he was just a camera guy, I didn’t pay too much attention to him.”

    1. Ronald Vonk says:

      Yeah we attracted a lot of attention. Doing the scene was pretty intense and we had to do it a number of times to get all the angles. Nobody jumped in to stop me and help poor Nina K though :)

  22. “Nino” has the dark humor, which makes it more palatable, IMHO.

  23. Drazen says:

    Hi man,

    great little piece of filmmaking…love the color correction…could you tell us a little bit how is your experience so far with the sony f3….does it kick ass…how much do you miss the lack of 60frames in full hd 1920×1080…from what I have seen it is great cam but I was wandering if the price if justified?

  24. Kelly says:

    Nice to receive the unexpected from you. Great narrative sequence and care with your edits. Perfectly ended.

  25. JustinC says:

    Just wondered why you are using the RED 18-50 over your other two CP.2s. Was it just easier to travel with the zoom or do you find the extended range much more useful?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      that RED zoom was made by Cooke until Tamron took over making them not soon after they started so it’s a marvellous purchase as pin sharp. Shooting fast having a fast zoom like that which is sharp as hell rather than change lenses constantly and i didn’t need to be at F2.1 F2.8 was fine. Especially in bright sunshine…most of time was at F4 anyway!

      1. JustinC says:

        Thanks!

  26. Steve says:

    I like most of Philip’s work, but not a fan of this one. It’s well shot of course, in fact the shots are beautiful.

    It’s the story that is disappointing. It looks risky, but anything that portrays a woman as a victim is safe today. Gratuitously throwing in a bad man senselessly murdering a sensuous “innocent” woman is taking the easiest road.

    Risky is telling stories that aren’t being told. Risky is telling unpopular, repressed, or un-wanted truths, and there are plenty of them in every culture, all the time, but innocent woman as victim of bad-man, is a popular easy sell today and it’s told all-the-time in many ways.

    Sorry to be critical, Philip. It’s what I think of this piece, though I wish I could make videos of this quality myself.

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      Hi Steve, i really recommend you listen to my commentary which I am posting shortly. Also do watch the alternate version.

      Also, this is new for me and an experiment.

      best

      P

    2. Ian Laurie says:

      It’s interesting that everyone assumes that the female character is completely innocent (at least in the first edit!) I also remember the name ‘Nina’ as the super evil assassin in 24! perhaps the Vonkanator is merely getting his revenge for past wrongs?

  27. Maquotto says:

    What is the advantage that Zacuto’s eye view finder has over the one already equipped on the F3?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      f3 viewfinder is TERRIBLE!!

      1. Maquotto says:

        I have read lots of compliments on Zacuto’s EVF by many video-graphers.
        So, it must be a very good viewfinder, as always are the products from Zacuto.
        Many people have wanted something like that for DSLRs, but for F3, even you seem not to have used it while shooting, as I see the photos above.
        Something went wrong or you thought you did not need it in the end?

        1. Philip Bloom says:

          I didnt use it for handheld shots as where it was placed needed a rig and I didn’t have one with me

  28. joelkrogman says:

    looked fantastic. thanks for the work. inspired to do some myself.

  29. Ivan says:

    That guy is such a fool!

  30. Ivan says:

    I have mixed feelings about using Colorista to ‘repair’ the skin of the actress. What is the point of using expensive, insanely sharp glass and then in post, make it soft again?
    She seems like a wonderful lady, but like all of us, she is not perfect. Why not accept those imperfections, rather than creating this artificial, unrealistic ‘beautiness’, which in the end, will lead to lower selfesteem among the public (and the actress)?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      hi Ivan

      ok look at it this way. we had no make up girl. if there was we would have evened out things there and then, we didn’t so i did it in post. the point is in the film she is perfection and she is taken away from us. PLEASE do not think it is anything like the stuff you see in magazines etc. this was a TINY little fix to make it better for her.

      Do you not realise how much make up is used in movies? Nino is much happier with me making her look fabulous no matter how i did it, with make up, lighting, or a tiny tweak in post. She is stunning in real life and the shot i wanted to use just needed a teeny tiny fix.

      p

      1. Ivan says:

        I must bring this thread up to date. Red giant just released ‘Magic Bullit Cosmo':
        http://www.redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-cosmo/

        “Magic Bullet Cosmo is your secret weapon for perfect HD closeups, glamor shots and age reduction in onscreen talent. Make a 30-year-old model, a 40-something actress and a 50-plus executive look equally terrific – and even better than she had imagined possible – with this quick, professional cosmetic cleanup tool for your video footage. Cosmo smooths skin tones, softens problem areas and fixes blemishes with simple beauty sliders powered by our Colorista II technology.”

        I think the marketing lingo says enough…

    2. nina k. says:

      Hello Ivan,

      Expensive, insanely sharp glass is good, for most things but not always complementary to the human face, it wouldn’t be complementary for even five year olds flawless skin. To be frank with you I look insanely tired, because I was. Had a long journey from US to Mallorca, very busy 3 days, only my walk from hotel room to the “class room” was what felt like a mile. We had finished shooting for our group assignment late the night before. It was a beautiful evening, refusing to call it a day we hung out downtown in a lovely cafe, I had my first real Spanish sangria over some very absorbing conversations. Being on a beautiful island you want to spend as less time in the hotel room as possible, so not much rest, I had gotten roughly 3-4 hours of snooze that night and I’m the type where I can’t function with less then 8 hours of sleep. There were people in the group who have gotten less then 6 hours of sleep in the past 48 hrs, imagine what they looked like :) starts with an aS. Good or bad it’s all stress, forgetting to stay hydrated etc. it all takes a tall on you, your skin flares up as in screaming “what the F r u doing to yourself?!”. I know guys who under the same circumstances can’t get a good shave in the morning because their skin is as they put it “not rested”. All I knew of dear Philip’s project was that I would be floating face down in the pool and narrating, I was actually more concerned how my butt was going to look sticking out of the water, not worried about my face at all. The story changed on me that morning, I had no idea the camera would be in my face all day. Aside from smudging eye pencil and mascara (from the heat, intense sun and tears because we laughed a lot) I did not have foundation on, I was thinking to put in on on location but forgot to bring it with me, did dust on the powder to prevent the “shine”. We did not have make-up or hair person, wouldn’t that been lovely, my eradicator was doubling as my wardrobe assistant (he is so sweet in reality :)

      I’m still in Mallorca, well rested and hydrated, and if we were to shoot the same film today I would’ve looked my best as in right now, not my worst as in the film. So if Philip fixed me up a bit, I’m only grateful because I don’t look like that in real life, not everyday at least :) hah now I know my enemies, sangria and people who keep me up! Immense Thanx to everyone involved, and to lovely Coco who kept reminding me to keep drinking woooooootaaa :)

      DISCLAIMER: no self-esteems were hindered in the making of this film.

      1. Ivan says:

        I found this thread to be very interesting.

        Just to be clear: I thought you looked stunning (even on a bad day), and, as always, Philip’s work is amazing.

        One more thing: One of my replies somehow got lost, or got deleted, I’m sure it was by accident. Anyhow, some interesting points were raised, esp by jake carvey.

    3. jake carvey says:

      Even ignoring the “beautification” aspect for a moment, one can make the argument that the worst enemy of storytelling is distraction. This is the underlying delicate contract with the audience which allows them to momentarily suspend their disbelief.

      The audience’s attention is easily distracted, and could easily become unnecessarily focused on something non-essential to the scene (such as whether the actress looks tired or had too much sangria, for instance). If that element is not the goal of the scene, then they may either disconnect completely, or lose focus on the emotional point of the scene.

      In the case of Charlize Theron’s character in “Monster”, or the protagonist of “The Elephant Man”, the makeup work goes in the other direction – and its very purpose is to illuminate the story and the theme.

      I propose that digital makeup is no different that physical makeup (esp. in this context), and that narrative film is not documentary, and that most people know the difference between movies and reality. Extensive magazine retouching, on the other hand, especially full body morphing, is far more damaging and heinous.

      People watch films to escape their reality, they read magazines for advice on modifying it. That’s where the difference lies in my mind anyway.

      Thoughts?

      IMHO

      – jake

      1. Philip Bloom says:

        I agree. Narrative we make it look like we want it to look. Documentary is different. Take my Venice People piece would i really want to add make up to him there or in post. of course not. BUT if I am doing a sit down interview for a long form documentary i will use make up on people to take the shine away…all depends on the job.

        to thing everything should be shown as it is in real life is first silly as what in real life is? do women not wear make up? do men wear toupees? is there no plastic surgery? life is full of artifice. As a filmmaker you decide where to draw the line and everyone has a different line.

  31. The picture of you guys handling those lenses and all that gear over the water put me on edge!
    On another note, I was enjoying all of the beautiful images in the film and then, wham! she’s dead. I understand the point, but now all I want to know is why did he do it? :(

    1. Ivan says:

      He did it because she was blocking the view on a beautiful sunset, imo.

    2. Nina K. says:

      ….and because he wanted to sit next to Philip at the café and bombard him with Spiegel reflex kamera questions but I beat him to it. When our eyes met, the twinkle in Ronald’s eye communicated a clear message – the Georgian must die…

  32. George says:

    It’s a bit like “Where The Wild Roses Grow” a Kylie Minogue and Nick Cave Song from the late nineties.
    Great shooting anyway , love it

  33. Never walking on the beach at sunset with you again. like we did that time.

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      that’s because you tried to fiddle with me!

  34. luv says:

    The picture looks very videoish, and the bumping “steady cam” style is very bad/sad,why? is this serious?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      videoish? really…

      bumpy steadicam? are you joking? you understand that is called handheld!!

      1. Carson Waugh says:

        You know, Videoish…everybody knows about videoish bumping style. Hell I hear Shane Hurlbut is hosting a video tutorial on it through B&H. Where have you been!?

  35. james says:

    i did like it, (original edit) i thought the girl was absolutely fantastic, but i kind of feel that the girl comitting suicide at the end would have been more emotive.
    definitely preferred the original edit.

  36. Carson Waugh says:

    My favorite shot has to be when she walks into indirect light and then into complete darkness under the shadow of some large obstruction. One thing that comes to mind is what his motive was…Jealousy maybe?

  37. luchian says:

    why those differences in contrast, saturation and the red color of the ski in the large shots and the shot between when she enters in the water ? ..and then the other shots that follow?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      it got darker. a passing of time as the sun set lower.

  38. Adam Loretz says:

    I’m glad I watched the Colorista tutorial. I didn’t know FCP plugins were so useful. Be interesting to see what we will we be able to do in the new FCPX, I saw some cool colour correction features from NAB. I think the re-edit really made a difference – thanks for sharing your work.

  39. willlyons says:

    Nice work! I loved the way you played with the sun. Not to mention, I always love an unexpected ending. That inspired me for sure, thanks.

  40. Well done. When that wide shot comes in with the quiet nat sound, totally got me. – thank you so much for the commentary, I always listen to the whole thing

  41. Alex says:

    Very Beautiful and thank you as always for the tutorials, many thanks for this website!

  42. Ben Todd says:

    Really interesting to watch, well done for making it.

    This camera seems to have a major problem with rolling shutter, the jelly on the walking was unbearable, it looks like an iphone.

    I don’t know how Sony can justify selling a camera for that much money with such a major problem. How can anyone begin to imagine that that is acceptable. Shocking ;-(
    What are people supposed to do if they want to shoot 90 degree shutter stuff, even the Red struggles when you clock the shutter up!

    I’d rather shoot on a 2/3rds chip size camera than put up with that, or get a group of like minded friends together and buy an Alexa.

    If you shoot handheld with any of these budget cameras, then it needs to be with a rig and much less aggressive IMO.

    Well done for putting it together.

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      jelly in walking Ben? Where?

      1. Ben Todd says:

        Hi Phil,

        Good work first off. This is not a criticism of your camera work, which was nice, more a criticism of the camera and it’s limitations

        How can you not say the opening hand held shots of the lady walking don’t have really bad rolling shutter motion? – perhaps your eye is getting used to this sort of thing now days??

        It has the same sort of feeling as when you try to add ‘smooth cam’ to a shot which is too wobbly to stabilize. It picture starts to compress, stretch and distort is strange ways which looks very unnatural I think. I will admit that Vimeo does seem to accentuate this sort of thing so perhaps on the original version it’s not so bad, but I’m sure it’s still there.

        I don’t really see the full-frame pay off in this instance. I shoot lots of DSLR stuff but if I know there is going to be lots of hectic (as opposed to smooth) handheld movement, then I’d rather have a CCD camera, even if it’s 1/3 chip.

        I’m sure the Panasonic camera is just as bad – if not worse. I just find it frustrating that no-one seems to care anymore about motion and gets so hung up on D.O.F.
        Sometimes think these companies are taking everyone for a ride….

        1. Philip Bloom says:

          hi Ben, i went frame by frame through it and I couldn’t see it. Maybe I am so used to awful DSLR rolling shutter that I when I see this I can’t see it…I saw no stretching, no distortion, just handheld..

          1. Ben Todd says:

            Not to worry –
            judging by the amount of travel, filming and blogging you do you probably just need to have a good kip and rest your eyes ;-)
            Best of luck with your next venture – it’s great that someone is out there putting this gear through its paces and then sharing the results, well done and thanks.

  43. Where exactly do i get a Steadicam Bumpee™ ?

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      I am making one soon. It’s a $7000 dollar “steadicam” style rig that emulates hand held…want one?

      1. STR1337 says:

        I’ll take 2. are they compatible with the jelly vision viewfinder?

  44. jake carvey says:

    I think this is a very relevant critique, regardless of whether or not it applies to this film.

    Traditionally, film thrived on the ability to evoke emotion via its very ability to capture moments which most people would never witness in their entire lives (foreign lands, warfare, intense passion), and would not have had the technical capability to have captured themselves even if it was right in front of them.

    It was the expense of equipment and the complexity of its operation that helped to form the Hollywood workflow and it was the technical skill, psychological intuition and visual passion of the artists which propelled it to become the most emotionally engaging art form ever created by humans. Now most of those technical hurdles have been overcome. An open mind and solid Google skills open up advanced techniques to anyone who loves the art form.

    This is a direction of thought I want to explore further – we might find that more people have great stories to tell, and that while commercial media has until now “owned” that market – perhaps now is a time for more people to tell their stories in motion pictures. If we can “sketch” with a camera, isn’t that a valid form of expression, whether or not we are pursuing a living at it?

    More than ever, the camera is a pencil. Nothing more, nothing less. It can be a rewarding pursuit for the amateur, while simultaneously supporting the consummate professional’s careeer.

    Without classifying “Insipiens” as one or the other, perhaps we have reached a point where we can make a classification in narrative film between a “sketch” and a fleshed out “short film”

    jake

  45. oh come on man!! – give it a rest. just accept it for what it is – NO money – very little crew, and NO real pre-production – and they made a very good film. just praise it and leave it alone.

  46. Nick N says:

    Hi Phil

    Nice work.

    Please could you share what filters you used to achieve the look too- the peachy dreamlike look. MBL, yes. What what filters & parameters from MBLooks?

    Thanks

    Nick

  47. Hi Philip!

    Thanks a lot for all your efforts! You inspired and guided into DSLR shooting a bloody lot of a people. Really appreciate your work!

    I noticed that somehow you got rid of a timeline within your filters tab in FCP. How you did that?

    (I feel like I messed grammar somewhere above – sorry still learning English)

    Paul

  48. Excellent work!

    I really enjoy your commentary, Phillip. Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts and reflections; it is very helpful.

    Cheers,

    Christopher

  49. Paul says:

    I am a newcomer to your work and am blown away by it – not just the quality, but your capacity to “share”. Thank you so much. In this particular clip I actually saw that exact scene of the lady’s close up face and thought her complexion looks so neutral yet perfectly so (flawless). Only after reading your post I see why. Great tool. I know nothing about DSLR video until I read your blog. Having been a large format photographer (see site for samples) quality is such a massive part of my approach to visuals. I despised camcorder quality mere mortals were restricted to and my earlier visits to video work left me depressed. But seeing your work with DSLRs has been a revelation. I have always wanted cinema quality if I ever worked with moving images… it seems this is attainable (albeit ultimately needing all the gizmos the price of a BMW). I am a book publisher and have a powerful 3-5 minute short I want to produce about the true story of a drug dealer, come armed robber, come prisoner, come redeemed person… I am trialling a friend’s 7D tomorrow for hands on trial to see if I can do this and get back to my passion – movies! You opened my eyes. One last thing… voice audio… never features much in your work… is it really such a nightmare to do if filming interviews with a DSLR?

  50. Lauri Hakala says:

    Hi Philip,

    I know that you travel a lot so how can you live without the switchable PAL/NTSC mode in F3? That is the only thing bothering me before making the purchase. I travel a lot between europe and the states so I took the ex1’s PAL/NTSC switch for granted and then realized there’s no such thing F3, am I correct? What’s your solution?

    Nice looking film by the way :)

    1. Lauri Hakala says:

      Oh I just heard that the F3 indeed is a world cam (NTSC/PAL switchable) :)

  51. Nick Bennett says:

    Great work Phillip, how do you get your vimeo to display 2:35:1 aspect? what are your settings?

    Regards

  52. Anonymous says:

    I was just about to go to bed and thought to check your website to see what’s new.. and I have to say I really enjoyed that. Nice pace, actually really liked the handheld shots(felt more personal than just pretty to look at), color grade was nice and subtle, good choice of track as usual and beautiful actress to go with it! nice one.

    I have to say, the more and more I see the F3 and images you can get from it, the more I think about ditching the idea of getting the Af101 and investing some of my own money in a Sony F3.

    I mean I know the panasonic is great ‘bang for buck’ as you said in your review, but it just can’t come close to Sony F3 for image quality? I’m also guessing you didn’t have the S-Log update at this point?

    Thanks again for sharing your work, much appreciated.

  53. Anonymous says:

    Hey Craig, you’re right my choice of the word ‘promoting’ was not the best one, of course you wouldn’t promote such an act. Having seen Philip’s explanation I completely understand the point now and as such it worked brilliantly as it provoked such a reaction from me.
    It does illustrate that things can be taken many ways and my first reaction was that it had markings of a misogynist nature, god knows there are many males around who don’t like women (I’m not suggesting Philip is one). I suppose from a personal point of view too many films/tv programs are based on senseless violence and I’m more than bored with it.
    Anyway, I support Philips creations and effort in every way and I’m not trying to be a critic for the sake of critique, I was just responding to the immediate affect it had on me and it succeeded brilliantly. Job Done!

  54. Peter Baker says:

    Philip, did you use the Zacuto EVF all the time? I had a look at an F3 and was amazed how terrible and mushy the viewfinder is for a camera whose format dictates shallow d.o.f.
    Have you found a configutation that works for you using it handheld? I tried using it with O’Connor handles and couldn’t get comfortable with it.

    1. Philip Bloom says:

      still fiddling with it!!

  55. lol that was funny!